Eli Schwartz

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Google Test

Knowledge Graph Included in Individual Google Search Results

Google is testing inserting knowledge graph information as a part of the actual search result. Typical knowledge graph info is shown just for the primary search query when it matches a brand, but in this test they are adding that to all sites that have knowledge graph enabled. The text that is included in the snippet is the same text that is in the knowledge box that would show up on the right side of the results.

Here is what the results looked like in this test when I searched “survey”. Notice the brand name to the right of the URL underneath the title.

knowledge box in search

 

This is what the knowledge box looks like as a part of the search result:

Knowledge box opened in search

And here’s what Wikipedia’s knowledge box looks like:

Another knowledge example

 

Have you seen something similar?

 

Google Test

Google Test: Adwords With White Backgrounds

Google is testing a new way of displaying Adwords ads that does not show a differentiating background color and instead labels the ad spots as “Ad”. Except for this label the paid and organic spots look exactly the same.

Google Test Adwords

This is the standard view that Google is showing now to users not in the test.

Traditional Adwords View

This new way of displaying ads will definitely make it even harder for users to differentiate between paid and organic positions.

Uncategorized

Does Google crawl 404 pages?

Does Google crawl and index 404 pages (not found)? I had heard conflicting theories from multiple people about how the Googlebot responded when it discovered a 404 pages. Does it immediately consider the 404 to be a hard stop, or will it crawl this like any other and possibly discover any linked pages.

I set out to find out by conducting the following test.

  1. I created a brand new page on an authoritative domain. There were no internal nor external links to this page
  2. The URL and title of the page was a single keyword that did not exist in Google
  3. Added a link to the new page on a 404 page of another authoritative domain
  4. The anchor text of the link was a word a word that did not exist in Google
  5. Edited a footer link on the domain to contain a typo, so Googlebot would crawl the 404 as fast as possible

Results:

  • Googlebot discovered the 404 in 6 hours.
  • Google immediately crawled the “hidden” page
  • The hidden page became the only result ranked on the non-existent keyword
  • There are still no results for the non-existent keyword used in the anchor text on the 404 page

Conclusions:

  • Google does crawl links discovered on a 404 of an authoritative domain
  • Googlebot does not trust the anchor text

I will continue testing to learn if the results change on a non-authoritative domain, and if a page can get ranked on a competitive keyword if the only link is on a 404 page.

 

International SEO

International SEO, How To Get Started

My prediction for 2014 is that International and Multilingual SEO becomes more important than it has ever been. If you have been doing SEO for awhile you already know that good keyword research is the bedrock of any SEO campaign. Keyword research defines the domain you choose, the structure of your site, and the content you create. There are dozens of ways to do keyword research using anything from a simple Google suggest search to SEMRush for deep competitive research.

But what do you when you need to conduct research in a language you don’t speak? Suddenly, all those great keyword research tools become useless or at least really hard to use. Don’t despair! If you are willing to be a little bit patient you can do keyword research without knowing a single word in a given language if you follow these steps. You can even use your data to decide which phrases and synonyms to target just like you would in English.

To learn how to get started on International SEO, try some of the steps I outlined in the presentation below or discussed on video here.  Any questions? Get in touch!

Google

Google Test: Placing Domain on Top of Result Title and Removing URL Path

Google seems to be testing where they place the URL for a specific result. In the test I noticed today, the URL is on top of the result. The result has the title and snippet, but Google is only showing the domain of the result and not the full path. I

 

Google URL on top of result

Clicking the down error next to the domain only shows you the “cached” or “similar” options and there is no option to show the full URL path.

 

Google URL test drop down

 

I like seeing the URL in a search result because I want to know if the result is a blog post, PDF or some other URL that I might not click. Additionally, there are times that I just want to copy the URL without clicking on it, and this option would no longer be available.

 

This gets really confusing when there are multiple results from the same domain.

Here is how the traditional results look:

Google traditional results

And here’s the test:

Google test - Google

 

Uncategorized

Pubcon 2013 Presentation Slides Collection

Here is a collection of as many Slideshare presentations as I was able to find on Twitter from this year’s Pubcon. My slides on In-House SEO Strategy are here.

 

If I am missing any, please submit them in the form below.

VInce Blackham: Pinterest Marketing 

Mike Ramsey: Local Marketing

Mike King: Content Quality

Alan Bleiweiss: SEO Auditing

Janet Driscoll-Miller: Landing Page Optimization

Matt Sitala: Social Comes Last

Stoney G DeGeyter: Keyword Research

Scott Hendison: Local and Mobile

Ken Jurina: Keyword Research

Mark Barerra: Keyword Research

Rebecca Murtaugh: Social Media and Search

Ben Cook: SEO Tools

Jacob Bohall: Algo Chaos

Ben Cook: WordPress SEO

Ben Cook: Creating Content

Roger Dooley: Conversion Optimization

Selena Narayanasamy: SEO Audits

Brian Lafrance: WordPress SEO

Todd Keup: CSS and HTML

Dana Lookadoo: SEO Personas

Rhea Drysdale: Brand Monitoring

Steve Floyd: Responsive Design

Greg Gifford: Local Search

Steve Floyd: Strategic Content

Mary Bowling: Data Management

Casey Markee: Author Rank

Paul Ryazanov Conversion Rate Optimization

Conferences

Pubcon Las Vegas 2013 Slides and Links

Thank you for attending my session on In-house SEO at Pubcon Las Vegas.

Slides:

Here are links to tools I mentioned:

ScreamingFrog: http://www.screamingfrog.co.uk/seo-spider/

Tamper for Firefox: https://addons.mozilla.org/En-us/firefox/addon/tamper-data/

Ayima Redirect Checker: http://www.ayima.com/seo-knowledge/redirect-checker.html

Splunk: http://www.splunk.com/

Awstats: Extra section http://www.internetofficer.com/awstats/track-googlebot/

Awstats: http://awstats.sourceforge.net/

NerdyData: http://nerdydata.com/

Web Developer Plugin: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/web-developer/bfbameneiokkgbdmiekhjnmfkcnldhhm?hl=en-US

SurveyMonkey Audience $50 offer: www.surveymonkey.com/pubcon

Google

Google’s Hummingbird: Attempts to Target Search Options Based on Query Type

According to Search Engine Land, Google’s new¬†Hummingbird¬†algorithm is supposed to be more “precise and fast,” putting greater emphasis on understanding the intent of the user’s query. As a part of Hummingbird, Google seems to now do more than focus target results to the query intent; they are also adjusting the search options navigation based on the perceived user intent.

Here are some examples of what appears to be a work in progress by Google.

When I searched Google¬†I see a standard search options navigation showing “Web”, “Images”, “Maps”, “Shopping”, “News” and “More”.

Google-standard-results

 

Adding the¬†word¬†nav into the query¬†made Google think that I was looking for an application since they swapped “news” for “applications” as a search option.

google-nav-in-nav

 

 

When I searched Marketing Software the “News” option was replaced with “Patents”.

patents-in-google-nav

 

Showing “patents” as an option seems to make sense when the query contained¬†software but when I swapped¬†software¬†with¬†tools,¬†Google replaced¬†“patents” with “books.”

books-in-nav

 

Curious, I queried the name of an actual book,¬†Marketing in the Age of Google¬†(by Vanessa Fox) to see if Google identified the query as a book. Unfortunately, Google thought that this query was for a video since they swapped the “books” option for “videos”.

videos-in-google-nav

 

I added the word¬†book¬†into the query to see if this would force “books” as a search option. However, Google’s intent matching was unable to recalculate so much so that they didn’t show any fifth option at all-only showing the four standard options.

no-option-in-google-nav

 

Very specific queries,(Root Android 4.3 Forum)¬†with the word¬†forum¬†showed “Discussions” as a search option…

discussions-in-nav

 

But, if the query is less specific, (Android Forum)¬†“discussions” is removed and the default “news” is shown instead.

Standard-android

 

Pasta dishes brings up “recipes” as a search option.

recipes-in-nav

As expected,¬†SEO blogs shows “blogs” as an option.

blogs-in-nav

 

Changing the Google search options based on user queries seems to be in its very early stages; however, this feature could be useful for anyone trying to figure out how Google might classify a keyword.

 

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