Eli Schwartz

According to Search Engine Land, Google’s new¬†Hummingbird¬†algorithm is supposed to be more “precise and fast,” putting greater emphasis on understanding the intent of the user’s query. As a part of Hummingbird, Google seems to now do more than focus target results to the query intent; they are also adjusting the search options navigation based on the perceived user intent.

Here are some examples of what appears to be a work in progress by Google.

When I searched Google¬†I see a standard search options navigation showing “Web”, “Images”, “Maps”, “Shopping”, “News” and “More”.

Google-standard-results

 

Adding the¬†word¬†nav into the query¬†made Google think that I was looking for an application since they swapped “news” for “applications” as a search option.

google-nav-in-nav

 

 

When I searched Marketing Software the “News” option was replaced with “Patents”.

patents-in-google-nav

 

Showing “patents” as an option seems to make sense when the query contained¬†software but when I swapped¬†software¬†with¬†tools,¬†Google replaced¬†“patents” with “books.”

books-in-nav

 

Curious, I queried the name of an actual book,¬†Marketing in the Age of Google¬†(by Vanessa Fox) to see if Google identified the query as a book. Unfortunately, Google thought that this query was for a video since they swapped the “books” option for “videos”.

videos-in-google-nav

 

I added the word¬†book¬†into the query to see if this would force “books” as a search option. However, Google’s intent matching was unable to recalculate so much so that they didn’t show any fifth option at all-only showing the four standard options.

no-option-in-google-nav

 

Very specific queries,(Root Android 4.3 Forum)¬†with the word¬†forum¬†showed “Discussions” as a search option…

discussions-in-nav

 

But, if the query is less specific, (Android Forum)¬†“discussions” is removed and the default “news” is shown instead.

Standard-android

 

Pasta dishes brings up “recipes” as a search option.

recipes-in-nav

As expected,¬†SEO blogs shows “blogs” as an option.

blogs-in-nav

 

Changing the Google search options based on user queries seems to be in its very early stages; however, this feature could be useful for anyone trying to figure out how Google might classify a keyword.